Ocean Action Hub

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Thank you to everyone who applied to the Ocean Innovation Challenge

25 Mar 2020 - We received a huge wave of proposals to address marine pollution. We're now reviewing all and will contact the best in the coming weeks to invite full proposals.

25 Mar 2020 - We received a huge wave of proposals to address marine pollution. We're now reviewing all and will contact the best in the coming weeks to invite full proposals. Follow us on social media for updates:

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Applying the hard lessons of coronavirus to the biodiversity crisis

26 Mar 2020 - 2020 was supposed to be a ‘Super Year for Nature,’ with a number of global meetings including the UN Ocean Conference. But the virus has lessons that apply to the global crises of biodiversity loss.

26 Mar 2020 - This year was supposed to be a ‘Super Year for Nature,’ with a number of global meetings; a World Conservation Congress, a UN Ocean Conference, and a UN Nature Summit – all culminating in a global biodiversity conference that would agree on a decade-long 'Post-2020 Biodiversity Framework'. This  was supposed to be the year that launched the Decade of Restoration, and that finally acknowledged nature-based solutions in climate negotiations. But COVID-19 had other plans. We must learn and adapt faster than ever, and the virus has lessons that apply to the global crises of biodiversity loss.

CONTINUE READING ONLINE HERE: https://www.undp.org/content/undp/en/home/blog/2020/applying-the-hard-lessons-of-coronavirus-to-the-biodiversity-cri.html

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Final days to enter UNDP’s Ocean Innovation Challenge

02 Mar 2020 - The OIC is seeking innovations that are transferable, replicable and scalable. Grants range from $50,000 to $250,000.

The first of several planned OICs focuses on SDG 14.1:Reduce Marine Pollution

See UNDP Press Release.

The criteria for applicants are as follows:

  • The innovations to be submitted can include technological as well as cutting edge policy, regulatory, financial, economic or other actions that address either sea-based or land-based sectors.
  •   Initial concepts can be submitted by public or private entities, including governments, private companies (including start-ups), NGO/CSO, United Nations entities, academic institutions, and intergovernmental organizations.
  • The Challenge must be implemented in and benefit stakeholders in developing countries but may be submitted by developing or developed country proponents.

For more information and to submit a preliminary concept, peruse the Ocean Innovation Challenge website at:
www.oceaninnovationchallenge.org.

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Reducing Plastic Pollution: Experiments by UNDP Ghana’s Accelerator Lab on recycling

18 Feb 2020 - One solution is a plastic recycling project which enables homes and businesses to deposit their recyclable plastic bottles in branded containers, at fuel stations across Accr

18 Feb 2020 - One solution is a plastic recycling project which enables homes and businesses to deposit their recyclable plastic bottles in branded containers, at fuel stations across Accra.

Ghana’s production of waste is rising rapidly, along with an increasing population and expanding economy. 75% of solid waste is simply discarded and only about 1.5% of plastic waste is recycled, contributing to poor sanitation and pollution. Much of this waste is recoverable, with an estimated value of US$ 15 billion. The potential for a circular economy is huge, but the current reality presents a significant policy challenge. Despite some pockets of good practice in waste-management, many issues need urgent attention.

In response to challenges such as this, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) has set up an innovative network of Accelerator Labs across the globe, including in Ghana, to identify, test and scale up solutions to developmental challenges.

In synergy with other initiatives being undertaken by UNDP in Ghana, such as the ‘Waste’ Recovery Platform, the Accelerator Lab is currently identifying, mapping and testing grassroots solutions for waste management. The aim is to drive changes in behaviour, increase take-up of recycling and thus improve waste management. One such solution is a plastic recycling project which enables homes and businesses to deposit their recyclable plastic bottles in branded containers, at fuel stations across Accra.

The Ghana Accelerator Lab team is deploying Behavioural Insight techniques to understand how individuals make decisions on recycling. Early results indicate that households and businesses prefer their recyclable waste to be collected at their doorsteps, instead of taking it to recycling points. Typically, this is linked to issues of accessibility (location of recycling points), affordability (perceived costs of the journey to recycling points - including time), and the existence of alternatives (including whether there is a recyclable waste collection service in place).

Recycling is not an entirely new concept in Ghana. Some communities have always re-used items – including plastic bottles. Indeed, there is an informal community which goes from house to house collecting plastic waste, for free or for a fee. But can informal solutions cope with the volume of plastic waste being generated?

CONTINUE READING ONLINE HERE: https://www.gh.undp.org/content/ghana/en/home/blog/2019-/_eco-conscious-kofi-and-just-passing-ama--experiments-by-undp-gh.html

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The Blue Tank – Innovative Solutions for a Sustainable Blue Economy

16 Jan 2020 - The UNDP Barbados & the Eastern Caribbean Blue Economy Accelerator Lab (Blue Lab) has launched the first-ever “Blue Tank” ­– a dynamic forum where innovators will pitch ideas to help build a sustainable blue economy in the Caribbean.

 

16 Jan 2020 - The UNDP Barbados & the Eastern Caribbean Blue Economy Accelerator Lab (Blue Lab), with support from the German Development Cooperation and the Qatar Fund for Development has launched the first-ever “Blue Tank” ­– a dynamic forum where innovators will pitch ideas to help build a sustainable blue economy in the Caribbean region.

The primary objective of the Blue Lab, as part of the world’s largest and fastest learning network, is to promote out-of-the-box-thinking and experimentation to support Small Island Developing States in the sustainable development of its ocean based economic sectors while contributing to SDG 14. Consequently, the Blue Tank has been conceptualised from this to advance the identification of new and creative grassroots solutions to the multifaceted and rapidly changing challenges of the blue economy.

CONTINUE READING ONLINE HERE: https://www.bb.undp.org/content/barbados/en/home/presscenter/articles/2019/the-blue-tank.html

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SINGLE-USE PLASTIC FREE WORKSPACES? IT IS POSSIBLE!

9 Jan 2019 - UNDP Accelerator Lab set the goal of encouraging colleagues to reduce single-use plastic use at work, assuming that behavior change will be transposed to their lives outside w

9 Jan 2019 - UNDP Accelerator Lab set the goal of encouraging colleagues to reduce single-use plastic use at work, assuming that behavior change will be transposed to their lives outside work.

This was to be our first "simple" experiment, as all our colleagues advocate daily for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), and they also know a lot about sustainability. After all, what can go wrong?

After the first month of our experiment, we can say with certainty that things turned out to be not so simple.

For a month, we conducted an information campaign on single use plastic, promoting the importance of reducing the use of this plastic through audio announcements, talking to almost all employees, putting up posters with key messages in strategic locations, making video presentations with the most important data, information and trends in reducing the use of disposable plastic globally as well as locally. We have organized challenges and implemented activities to reduce the total number of waste bins, as well as activities to replace plastic bags with textile ones. We have flooded social networks through UN agency channels with the information that as the UN we are becoming the first single-use plastic-free workspace in Bosnia and Herzegovina. We counted each plastic item our colleagues brought into the building and were repeating the mantra non-plastic is fantastic!

CONTINUE READING ONLINE HERE: https://www.ba.undp.org/content/bosnia_and_herzegovina/en/home/Blog/single-use-plastic-free-workspaces--it-is-possible-.html

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UNDP launches new Ocean Innovation Challenge

23 Jan 2020 - UNDP has launched a new call to action, the Ocean Innovation Challenge (OIC) to accelerate progress on SDG14, seeking innovations that are transferable, replicable and scalable. The Challenge grants range from $50,000 to $250,000.

23 Jan 2020 - UNDP has launched a new call to action— Ocean Innovation Challenge (OIC) to accelerate progress on SDG 14 targets. The OIC seeks innovations that are transferable, replicable and scalable. The Challenge grants range from $50,000 to $250,000.

Recognizing the increasing urgency of tackling ocean pollution, particularly from plastics and nutrients, the first of several planned OICs focuses on SDG 14.1- Reduce Marine Pollution.

The momentum on ocean protection and restoration has rapidly accelerated particularly since the 2017 Ocean Conference. However, a number of the SDG 14- Life Below Water targets still lag behind.  Between overfishing, pollution, habitat loss and the multiple impacts of climate change on ocean ecosystems, the ocean has never faced such a diverse range of threats.

CONTINUE READING ONLINE HERE: https://www.undp.org/content/undp/en/home/news-centre/news/2020/undp-launches-new-ocean-innovation-challenge.html

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Technology and tradition help restore Timor’s mangrove forests

6 Jan 2019 - Community involvement has been key to the success of a four-year program revitalising ecosystems central to defending against climate change and sustaining livelihoods. 

6 Jan 2019 - Community involvement has been key to the success of a four-year program revitalising ecosystems central to defending against climate change and sustaining livelihoods. 

“We aren’t doing this because of money, but because we now understand the importance of mangroves for our community,” says Timorese mother and villager Sepora Domingas Cardoso.

Cardoso, lives in the quiet coastal town of Ulmera in Timor Leste’s Liquiça district, around 30 minutes drive west of the capital Dili.

With about 50 other Ulmera community members, mostly women, Cardoso is working to restore the mangrove forests of Liquiça. She has collected seeds, planted over 6000 seedlings by hand and monitored the health of plants.

The Ulmera residents receive small financial incentives for their participation in the public-private partnership “Coastal Resilience” project that aims to improve the environmental resilience of Timor-Leste's coastal communities.

“In the beginning the program didn’t pay us for the work, but they came and taught us a lot about mangroves and their role in our lives and our environment,” Cardoso said, describing the 2016 start of the four-year project.

Run by the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) and the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries (MAF) with funding from the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and the Timorese government, the “Coastal Resilience” project is helping restore 1000 hectares of mangrove forests in 11 locations on Timor’s north and south coasts.  

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Climate change and oceans in flux: How local responses in Mexico are stemming the tide of an invasive seaweed

7 Jan 2019 - Ocean warming leads to more sargassum blooms. Caribbean countries dependent on tourism and fisheries are losing visitors marine life to this invasive weed.

7 Jan 2019 - Ocean warming leads to more sargassum blooms. Caribbean countries dependent on tourism and fisheries are losing visitors marine life to this invasive weed. Scientists are teaming up with UNDP Mexico to research solutions.

Since 2015, the eastern coast of Mexico’s Yucatan peninsula, the state known as Quintana Roo, has been under siege. An invasion of noxious macroalgae known as Sargassum is decimating the coastal ecosystems along the Riviera Maya, an area known for its pristine beaches and sought out by as many as 45 million visitors annually.

While much of the international attention and news has focused on the effects of Sargassum on tourism, communities up and down the coast are feeling the effects more acutely via disruptions to local ecosystems, and are finding sustainable ways to adapt and preserve balance.

CONTINUE READING ONLINE HERE: https://undplac.exposure.co/stemming-the-tide

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Ocean Sciences Meeting 2020, San Diego, USA

The Ocean Sciences Meeting (OSM) is the flagship conference for the ocean sciences and the larger ocean-connected community.  As we approach the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Developme

nt, beginning in 2021, it is increasingly important to gather as a scientific community to raise awareness of the truly global dimension of the ocean, address environmental challenges, and set forth on a path towards a resilient planet. 

The Ocean Sciences Meeting 2020 is co-sponsored by AGU, the Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO), and The Oceanography Society (TOS).  Through the combined power of these three organizations, along with the broader conservation-focused community, this meeting provides attendees the opportunity to bridge disciplines, connect communities, and make lasting partnerships. 

Early registration closes: 8 Jan 2020

More here: https://www.agu.org/Ocean-Sciences-Meeting

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