Ocean Action Hub

[ SDG Target 14.1 ] By 2025, prevent and significantly reduce marine pollution of all kinds, in particular from land-based activities, including marine debris and nutrient pollution.

Definition

Land-based sources (such as agricultural run-off, discharge of nutrients and pesticides and untreated sewage including plastics) account for approximately 80% of marine pollution, globally. Marine habitats worldwide are contaminated with man-made debris. Oil spills remain a concern, though actual spills have decreased steadily for several decades. SDG 14.1 calls for the prevention and significant reduction of marine pollution of all kinds, in particular from land-based activities, including marine debris and nutrient pollution, by 2025.

Excessive nutrients from sewage outfalls and agricultural runoff have contributed to the increasing incidence of low oxygen (hypoxic) areas known as dead zones, where most marine life cannot survive, resulting in the collapse of some ecosystems. There are now close to 500 dead zones with a total global surface area of over 245,000 km², roughly equivalent to that of the United Kingdom. The excess nitrogen can also stimulate the proliferation of seaweeds and microorganisms and cause algal blooms. Such blooms can be harmful (HABs), causing massive fish kills, contaminating seafood with toxins and altering ecosystems.

Litter can accumulate in huge floating garbage patches or wash up on the coasts. Light, resistant plastics float in the Ocean, releasing contaminants as they break down into micro-particles that animals mistake for food. Fish and birds can choke on these particles, get sick as they accumulate toxins in their stomachs, or become entangled in larger debris.

As the world saw in 2010, the Gulf of Mexico deep-water oil spill had a devastating effect on the entire marine ecosystem, as well as the populations that depend on the marine areas for their livelihoods. Smaller oil spills happen every day, due to drilling incidents or leaking motors, negatively impacting birds, marine mammals, algae, fish and shellfish.

SOURCE: UNESCO website

Latest

G7 leaders recently announced that “our world must not only become net zero, but also nature positive, for the benefit of both people and the planet.”

Nature positive is a disruptive idea and it is a new business model based on regeneration, resilience and recirculation – not destruction and pollution.

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The President of the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA), Volkan Bozkır, convened this one-day High-level Event on the Ocean, four years after the 2017 UN Ocean Conference, to drum up momentum by enabling a review of progress and actions required in the lead up to the Second UN Ocean Conference to conven in Lisbon, Portugal, in 2022.

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Here are some article's highlitghts: 

  • 2050 is predicted to be a bleak milestone for the oceans - but it's not too late to avert disaster.
  • Here are 10 actions the world can take to strengthen and preserve our oceans for generations to come.
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19 Nov 2020 - Draft new mandatory regulations to cut the carbon intensity of existing ships have been approved by IMO's Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC). 
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9 Nov 2020 - WEF - There could be 14.4 million tonnes of microplastics at the bottom of the sea, new research says.

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23 Oct 2020 - Since its launch, with only four founding members in June 2020, the Global Industry Alliance (GIA) for Marine Biosafety has been actively expanding with new members joining.

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22 Oct 2020 - SDG Knowledge Platform - During the inaugural Ocean Stewardship Annual Review, CEOs addressed five "tipping points" for a healthy and productive ocean.

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21 Oct 2020 - ‘Ghost gear’ is damaging sea habitats and killing wildlife.

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12 Oct 2020 - Invasive aquatic species have a tremendous negative effect on the world’s marine ecosystems.

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9 Oct 2020The 18th edition of UNEP’s Foresight Brief highlights the global concern on marine plastic litter pollution and calls for monitoring and assessment.
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8 Oct 2020 - Today the £50 million 

Earthshot Prize
launches to incentivise change and help repair our planet.

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6 Oct 2020 - Guardian UK - Thirty times more plastic on ocean floor than surface, analysis suggests, but more trapped on land than sea.

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