Ocean Action Hub

[ SDG Target 14.1 ] By 2025, prevent and significantly reduce marine pollution of all kinds, in particular from land-based activities, including marine debris and nutrient pollution.

Definition

Land-based sources (such as agricultural run-off, discharge of nutrients and pesticides and untreated sewage including plastics) account for approximately 80% of marine pollution, globally. Marine habitats worldwide are contaminated with man-made debris. Oil spills remain a concern, though actual spills have decreased steadily for several decades. SDG 14.1 calls for the prevention and significant reduction of marine pollution of all kinds, in particular from land-based activities, including marine debris and nutrient pollution, by 2025.

Excessive nutrients from sewage outfalls and agricultural runoff have contributed to the increasing incidence of low oxygen (hypoxic) areas known as dead zones, where most marine life cannot survive, resulting in the collapse of some ecosystems. There are now close to 500 dead zones with a total global surface area of over 245,000 km², roughly equivalent to that of the United Kingdom. The excess nitrogen can also stimulate the proliferation of seaweeds and microorganisms and cause algal blooms. Such blooms can be harmful (HABs), causing massive fish kills, contaminating seafood with toxins and altering ecosystems.

Litter can accumulate in huge floating garbage patches or wash up on the coasts. Light, resistant plastics float in the Ocean, releasing contaminants as they break down into micro-particles that animals mistake for food. Fish and birds can choke on these particles, get sick as they accumulate toxins in their stomachs, or become entangled in larger debris.

As the world saw in 2010, the Gulf of Mexico deep-water oil spill had a devastating effect on the entire marine ecosystem, as well as the populations that depend on the marine areas for their livelihoods. Smaller oil spills happen every day, due to drilling incidents or leaking motors, negatively impacting birds, marine mammals, algae, fish and shellfish.

SOURCE: UNESCO website

Latest

28 Apr 2017 - The fate of the world’s marine life today - including the threatened bluefin tuna - is in all our hands

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On Africa’s west coast the ocean is hearth and home, but climate changes are resulting in rising sea levels, degraded fish stocks, coastal degradation and more.
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26 Apr 2017 - Flip-flops, one of the most ubiquitous types of ocean pollution globally, are being recycled into colourful artwork by a Kenyan company to raise awareness.

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26 Apr 2017 - For Sri Lanka, heavily economically dependent on the ocean, UN initiatives relating to the ocean and climate change are of particular importance.

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25 Apr 2017 - Single use plastic that is used and thrown away often ends up in the ocean. A few years back it was estimated there was $100 Billion dollars worth of this material in our oceans.

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24 Apr 2017 - UNDP OCEAN BLOG SERIES - Local communities are at the forefront of marine resources management.

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22 Apr 2017 - UNOPS and We Are The Oceans (WATO) will work together in support of Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 14.

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Film sur les écosystèmes marins inconnus en Mauritanie : hotspots de biodiversité pélagique, sanctuaires de baleines, récifs de coraux d’eau froide, cold seeps et canyons. 

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20 Apr 2017Adidas is releasing special limited edition versions of four Major League Soccer (MLS) kits as part of its ongoing eco-innovation partnership with ocean conservation group Parley for the Oceans.

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19 Apr 2017 - As many countries turn inward, it is more important than ever to tackle critical challenges that are beyond the reach of any single state and which compel us to work together.

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18 Apr 2017 - A five-day regional training workshop on Coastline Mapping using Satellite Imagery was launched yesterday at the Mauritius Oceanography Institute (MOI) in Albion.

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17 Apr 2017 - More people than ever are coming to see the reef and those who make a living showing it off want the world to know it’s still a natural wonder. But they worry about its future, and that of their 64,000-strong industry.

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